Page 7 of 8

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 18:12 22 Jun 2019
by GreenThing
Oh dear. Looks like Vettel’s mojo has well and truly gone. I heard a rumour that he’s retiring at the end of the season, didn’t sound likely when I heard it, but if things don’t improve he just might say fk it.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 09:47 24 Jun 2019
by The-Pilgrim
GreenThing wrote: Oh dear. Looks like Vettel’s mojo has well and truly gone. I heard a rumour that he’s retiring at the end of the season, didn’t sound likely when I heard it, but if things don’t improve he just might say fk it.


Yeah its been a rumour for a month or so and Vettel chucking out quotes like 'this isn't the sport i fell in love with' won't help the rumours go away. I hope he stays, I find him to be one of the more likeable, down to earth drivers on the grid.

Shocker of a race, the title is over, its all about the battle in the midfield now and how long Red Bull allow Gasly to occupy one of their seats before they get rid of him.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 16:42 24 Jun 2019
by GreenThing
It was a poor race to watch. Unfortunately people like to moan about a dull race, but keep quiet about the good ones. Ignoring the Merc dominance for a moment, the season has been pretty good on the whole. In 20 years time people will be reminiscing about the classic year where Merc broke records and won all the races, just like they do about McLaren when they won all but one race.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 04:58 25 Jun 2019
by Clarke_B
Very poor race but Paul Ricard was always a testing track as opposed to a racing track. The amount of run off is ludicrous!

On way to Stansted airport to begin my trek to Speilberg for next Sundays race via Bratislava, Vienna and Graz. Its looking like being a hot one in central Europe!
Hopefully the beers will be good at the circuit.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 06:53 25 Jun 2019
by GreenThing
In MotoGP there is a system for concessions for the smaller teams and I think this could work in F1. Regular in-season testing and relaxed rules on testing for the hack of the grid teams, which is withdrawn when teams reach certain milestones. Tie in the extra testing with a young driver development programme and you have a way in for youngsters which also helps close the gap between front and back of the grid.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 16:10 25 Jun 2019
by MickyD
GreenThing wrote: Oh dear. Looks like Vettel’s mojo has well and truly gone. I heard a rumour that he’s retiring at the end of the season, didn’t sound likely when I heard it, but if things don’t improve he just might say fk it.

I'm not sure I'd be all that upset to see him go now - he's become quite the petulant, error-prone whinger since he dominated with Red Bull. It hasn't worked out at Ferrari in the way he hoped, but where else would he go to stand any chance of another championship? Also, there are so many young guns coming through - team mate Leclerc included - that I think the best he can look forward to, at least before the next major regs change, is a string of thirds or fourths behind Merc.

All mojo-sapping factors, for sure! (Sorry, frr shrr. :-))

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 07:29 30 Jun 2019
by MickyD
Well, if the race today is half as good as the nicely jumbled grid promises, it should go a long way to erasing the memories of the French GP. Oh, hang on, I can't remember anything from the French GP anyway!

I was a bit confused as to why Norris will be starting behind Hamilton, but it's all to do with the order in which the penalties are handed out.

https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/aust ... 4/4485386/

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 07:49 30 Jun 2019
by GreenThing
“The FIA system applies penalties in the order they are handed out, but vacant grid slots are only closed up once all the sanctions have been handed out, rather than the order being shuffled up after each driver is moved.“

Magnasson moves back from 5th leaving a blank grid slot. Hamilton then moves to 5th and fills that empty slot ahead of Norris. This leaves an empty slot in 2nd so everyone shuffles up a place to close this gap. Effectively Hamilton moves up a place to 4th to fill the gap he left when he took his penalty.

Why do the FIA insist on implementing rules in such a complicated and confusing way?

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 09:03 30 Jun 2019
by MickyD
I think they would argue that although complicated and confusing on the surface, it's actually the fairest way. Many such systems seem absurdly convoluted when they're explained in precise detail, but they have to be framed in such a way as to leave no room for doubt or interpretation - with the endless bleedin' gripes and appeals and the sniffing out of loopholes that imprecise regs always encourage.

It can of course be argued that F1 is woefully over-regulated in general, but it pretty much has to be nailed down to the last nut and bolt or there will always be teams who seek to take advantage (usually the richest ones who can afford to tinker) - which still happens anyway, despite the regulators' best efforts.

Anyway, although it's a shame for Norris, isn't it great to see the McLaren name near the top of the field again? It seems that it's not a one-off after all. Williams next?! (Not this season, though...)

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 09:25 30 Jun 2019
by GreenThing
I’m not sure it is the fairest way to apply penalties as one driver gets a 2 place drop for a 3 place penalty while another driver who gets a 5 place penalty moves the full 5 places back. After moving back to 10th, why doesn’t Magnussen shuffle forward again?

I agree that the rules have to be watertight to stop the teams exploiting loopholes.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 10:07 30 Jun 2019
by MickyD
Fair point, but I guess it's just one of those anomalies that are occasionally thrown up by a rigid application of rigid rules. Sometimes they go against a sense of fairness even though they're designed to be as reasonable as possible.

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 14:36 30 Jun 2019
by MickyD
What a race - but ugggghhhh. Please, stewards - don't do it!

Re: F1 2019

Posted: 18:43 30 Jun 2019
by MickyD
And, after a very long period of silence, they didn't!

Within the current regulations I think there was a strong case for penalising Vertsappen there - and the several hours' delay strongly suggests that at least one or two of the stewards thought the same - but for the sake of racing, and of a fantastic sporting story, I'm really glad that the result was left to stand.

F1 needed that.