Page 72 of 72

Re: EU vote

Posted: 12:54 26 Feb 2021
by Frank_Butcher
Balham_Green wrote:
Frank_Butcher wrote: Two months in and it would be interesting to get a sense of the direct impact of Brexit to date. Whilst there are clearly problems with trade and shipping which isn't unexpected, we haven't fallen off the edge of a cliff as some had perhaps anticipated. But what direct impacts on our day to day living have been seen so far?

The main one I can cite is a delayed shipment (5 days) from a Dutch based clothing manufacturer. Having read the horror stories I expected to get surcharged but that never transpired. The second one was an online order that couldn't be shipped to the UK - I went elsewhere and wasn't inconvenienced.

I genuinely can't think of anything else that has impacted me personally so far.


Ah right so if after less than 2 months it hasn't impacted YOU personally that's the main thing isnt it? Just as long as there is no short sighted or selfish thinking.


Lol.

Re: EU vote

Posted: 12:56 26 Feb 2021
by Frank_Butcher
themightykeithfear wrote: Due to Covid, export levels are lower eg foods for European restaurants, and because of our unilateral decision not to impose full Customs checks on our side until April, we are really only semi-Brexited at the moment. However some of the tangible negative consequences to date are :

Amsterdam overtakes London as the largest share dealing capital in Europe as £1 trillion of assets and &,7,500 City jobs go to Europe. New York has also had a Brexit bounce as London loses its edge without equivalence status and the European Financial passport. The Governor of the Bank of England warned yesterday that £32 trillion of derivatives trading is at risk if the EU do not grant financial equivalence to London.

The National Federation of Fishermen's Organization say their members are facing ruin with a "brick wall of bureaucracy”. Fish (and meat) now have to meet rules on “products of animal origin”. Exporters must fill out an Export Health Certificate and have their goods checked at an EU Border Control Post. Hundreds of tonnes of fish have rotted at the ports, Chilled mince, shellfish and sausages are banned from export completely. Cornish fishermen say unless something changes they will lose their jobs and homes.

Exports from GB to N Ireland have dropped by 50% because of the extra costs involved and the supermarkets say unless these problems are resolved by April when the grace period ends, delivering food to N Ireland is not viable, Meanwhile Holyhead has also seen more than a 50% drop in trade as the ferry companies have set up extra routes from Ireland to Europe, cutting out the UK completely.

Half the trucks coming back from the EU are empty as under the new rules UK trucks are only allowed 1 drop off pick up en route. Again the hauliers association say this is unviable in the long term. Logistics firms are finding it hard to get foreign hauliers to come to the UK as most are not able / dont want to have to complete the copious paperwork required at the borders. My brother's company are having to pay up to double the rates which will be passed on to the consumer in price rises.

Online shopping from the EU is hugely more expensive with customs duties and VAT being applied on arrival.

Musicians and entertainers, like the fishermen, say they have been betrayed, where touring in Europe now requires huge amounts of paperwork and applying for work visas. Arch Brexiteer Roger Daltrey said musicians have been "shamefully failed".

On a personal level my client who imports from Sweden told me yesterday that deliveries that took 3-5 days last year now take over a month, and this will get worse once the grace period end.

So thats the down side, on the upside theres fish ! They're happy cos they're not being caught anymore!

And there's the blue passports! Although compared to the red one they don't give you the right to live work and retire in our 27 closest neighbouring countries.


I think you misread the question. What have the direct impacts been on you?

Re: EU vote

Posted: 13:39 26 Feb 2021
by themightykeithfear
Well I referred to my clients and brother whose businesses have been hit hard but how about not being able to live work and retire in 27 of our neighbouring countries. I was thinking of retiring to Spain and fortunately I have an Irish granddad, so can get a passport that retains my freedom, others won’t be so lucky.

Re: EU vote

Posted: 14:23 26 Feb 2021
by Balham_Green
themightykeithfear wrote: Well I referred to my clients and brother whose businesses have been hit hard but how about not being able to live work and retire in 27 of our neighbouring countries. I was thinking of retiring to Spain and fortunately I have an Irish granddad, so can get a passport that retains my freedom, others won’t be so lucky.


You can't stay in an EU country for more than 3 months.

Re: EU vote

Posted: 16:27 26 Feb 2021
by Guiri Green
Balham_Green wrote:
themightykeithfear wrote: Well I referred to my clients and brother whose businesses have been hit hard but how about not being able to live work and retire in 27 of our neighbouring countries. I was thinking of retiring to Spain and fortunately I have an Irish granddad, so can get a passport that retains my freedom, others won’t be so lucky.


You can't stay in an EU country for more than 3 months.


Without one of the various Visas (Spain), but that could change. I'm still planning on 90 out of every 180 day rolling period. Worked out how to move animals and work within the new rules months ago. PPPPPP.

Re: EU vote

Posted: 16:32 26 Feb 2021
by Guiri Green
One for Shellfish fans. Plan for success, prepare for failure. BREXIT doesn't have to be the end of anyone's world if you've accepted it and get on with life rather than spend the rest of your days beefing about it. I didn't want it but I'm not going to let it hold me back. Wills and ways and all that.

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornw ... ve-5025070

Re: EU vote

Posted: 14:27 04 Mar 2021
by mervyn
I’m trying to get my head around today’s BBC news item that exactly half of all previous Ireland to the continent deliveries which used to pass through Britain are now going direct from Dublin and Cork to Roscoff, St Malo and Cherbourg. This is apparently costlier than driving through the UK, but avoids delays as a result of the new bureaucracy.

So who are the winners and losers?

Obviously UK based Irish Sea and Channel ferry operators, plus the Chunnel are losing revenue to Irish based ferries, and we are losing UK port fees.

However our motorways are presumably less clogged, and all other Uk/continental traffic will be less crowded at ports when we return to normal.

Re: EU vote

Posted: 15:07 04 Mar 2021
by Quinny
I wouldn't have thought that there would be a marked reduction in traffic on motorways as hauliers bypassed the Britain land-bridge between Ireland and the rest of the UK, TBH. That being said, routes like Holyhead would be a lot, lot quieter (it was mental the last time I visited Anglesey about 4 or 5 years ago), but I read that the drop in traffic would have a major impact on local jobs on the island as it was such a big source of employment for the area.